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Урок 15. Saying goodbye. (Прощание.)

Jackie: Hello, welcome to How to… with BBC Learning English and me, Jackie Dalton. This programme is about ways of saying goodbye… there are plenty of expressions in English you can use, other than just goodbye, of course and we’ll look at some of the situations where they might be appropriate.

Let’s take a trip to the pub, imagine Alex is with friends. It’s getting late and Alex decides he wants to go home.

Example
Right then, I suppose it’s time I made a move!

Jackie: It’s time I made a move is a way of saying it’s time for me to go. He starts the sentence with right then.

Example
Right then, I suppose it’s time I made a move!

Jackie: Right then is a way of getting attention and often signals that the speaker is about to do something or make a suggestion… Right then, it’s time to go! Right then! Let’s go shopping! There are several other expressions you could use which also serve as a way of getting attention, which you could use before you want to announce that you’re leaving. Listen to these variations.

Examples
Well, I suppose it’s time I made a move!
OK, I suppose it’s time we made a move!
All right guys, I suppose it’s time to make a move!
Anyway, I suppose it’s time I made a move!

Jackie: Well, OK, all right guys and anyway are all ways of signalling that there is something you want to suggest or do – in this case, make a move. Listen again.

Examples
Well, I suppose it’s time I made a move!
OK, I suppose it’s time we made a move!
All right guys, I suppose it’s time to make a move!
Anyway, I suppose it’s time I made a move!

Jackie: Instead of saying I suppose it’s time I made a move, you could make a more definite statement telling everyone you’re going – I’m going to make a move.

Examples
Right, I’m going to make a move! See you later!

Jackie: I’m going to make a move! See you later! See you later is an expression we hear very often when friends or colleagues say goodbye to each other, generally when they’re going to see each other quite soon.

Examples
See you later guys!

Jackie: You could of course be more specific about when you’ll see them.

Examples
That’s me finished for the day. See you all tomorrow, everybody!
See you tonight!
Alright, well, I’ll see you on Monday.
See you at the party!

Jackie: So we’ve explored the expressions it’s time I made a move and see you later… listen to this next clip. What expression does Callum use to say he’s leaving?

Example
Right guys, I’m off, I’ll see you later!

Jackie: I’m off, which is another, quite informal, way of saying you’re going.
Listen to some more examples.

Examples
Right, lovely to see you all – I’m off now, bye!
OK, I’m off! See you tomorrow!
Right, that’s me off, guys!

Jackie: In that last clip we also heard that’s me off – a variation on I’m off. Another thing you might do when saying goodbye is showing pleasure at having see the person. You could use phrases like it’s been lovely to see you or good to see you again.

Examples
It’s been lovely seeing you.
Right, lovely to see you all. I’m off now, bye!
Good to see you again!
Nice to see you!

Jackie: If it’s someone you haven’t seen for a while, you could say it’s been nice to catch up.

Examples
Well, I’m going to have to go but it’s been great to catch up.
Nice to catch up with you again and I’ll see you soon!

Jackie: And it’s always nice to wish people a pleasant time.

Examples
Nice to see you, have a good night!
Bye James, have a good day!
All right, well, have a good weekend!

Jackie: If you’ve been someone’s guest, it is of course normal to thank them.

Examples
Andrew, thanks, it’s been a lovely evening. Thank you very much but we must be off,
we have to catch a train… um, thanks again for a lovely evening!
Thanks it’s been a lovely evening, but I ought to think about heading home soon.
Thanks again for all that lovely food and you must come over to ours some time!

Jackie: It would be considered quite rude if you had had food or drink at someone’s house and then just said good bye without thanking them for it. So the kinds of phrases we heard in those examples are always useful to know – it’s been a lovely evening; thank you for the lovely food; thank you for a lovely time, it was really nice. Another set of expressions that you might find useful is language for leaving in a hurry… you’re having coffee with a friend and suddenly realise you’ve got to go, or you’ll miss your train. Listen to some of the phrases that come up in these examples.

Examples
I’m sorry, I’m gonna have to dash! I’ve just realised I’m gonna miss my train if I don’t go now, but I’ll see you later – bye bye!
Yikes! Is that the time! I’ve gotta go!
I’m really sorry, but I’m gonna have to dash off to catch my train.
Sorry to have to leave so soon, but otherwise I’m gonna miss my train – must dash!
Cheerio!

Jackie: So some of the key phrases we heard there were I must dash or I’m going to have to dash – an informal way of saying you’re going to have to leave quickly. We also heard I’ve gotta go! All the people also apologised: I’m sorry to have to leave so soon; I’m sorry I’m gonna have to dash. Listen again.

Examples
I’m sorry, I’m gonna have to dash! I’ve just realised I’m gonna miss my train if I don’t go now, but I’ll see you later – bye bye!
Yikes! Is that the time! I’ve gotta go!
I’m really sorry, but I’m gonna have to dash off to catch my train.
Sorry to have to leave so soon, but otherwise I’m gonna miss my train – must dash!
Cheerio!

Jackie: And at the end there, we heard very light-hearted and English word to say goodbye – Cheerio!

Example
Cheerio!

Jackie: Right then, I suppose it’s time I made a move. Thank you very much for listening – it’s been lovely talking to you! And have a lovely day!